There are some very unique and important requirements for filming at Kiwiburn. Whether this is your first year or you are a seasoned veteran, please read carefully!
It’s your task to ask! Kiwiburners hold their privacy in high regard – always ask permission of your subjects before you shoot.
We call sharing with friends and family “personal use.” Everything else requires expressed permission.
We have a duty to protect the Kiwiburn community from commercialism (NO advertising or commodification) and unwanted exploitation (eg. porn or voyeurism), and to ensure the rights of our participants. We don’t think that kind of exploitation is good for our community.

We’ll credit your work in any publications or projects!

Media Rights and Responsibilities

Kiwiburn is a private event held on private land. As a participant or member of the media, you must be aware of your rights and responsibilities. Kiwiburn is committed to preserving the uniquely creative and noncommercial character of its culture. To that end, we ask all participants, including members of the media, to exercise and respect certain rights and responsibilities. Read on:

Personal Use Media:

Burners are welcomed to use photos, videos, and audio recordings obtained at the event for their personal use, which includes:
– Sharing with your friends and personal social media networks.
– Displaying on personal websites—as long as the websites do not sell any products or services, and do not pretend or appear to be an official Kiwiburn website.
– Posting to your personal accounts on photo-sharing sites such as Flickr, Instagram, YouTube, and Tumblr—as long as the posts aren’t commercial in any manner and the accounts aren’t used for purposeful promotion. You may not directly monetise any media through paywalls or advertisements.

Every burner with a camera has a responsibility to be respectful to the community and its members!

Professional Use Media:

If you wish to use any photo, video, or audio from the event for any non-personal use, you must have permission from Kiwiburn.

Non-personal use includes:
– Publishing photos in a printed or online book, magazine, or newspaper.
– Using footage in a professional quality video.
– Displaying images on a non-personal website or in a gallery show.
– Using imagery in a documentary or TV show.
– Distributing media to any third-party group or publication. This includes offering photos for publication, or making any commercial or promotional use of event media.

You have the right to express yourself and create art as a photographer, videographer, and/or audio artist.
Unless you have prior permission from Kiwiburn, you may only use photos, videos, or audio obtained at the event for personal use.
You are responsible for respecting the participants you wish to record and seeking their permission before photographing or filming them. If you are asked to stop filming, you must do so immediately. You have the responsibility not to interfere with the immediate experience of other participants.

All members of the media—and anyone else who plans to make non-personal use of event imagery—must check in with the Media Team upon arrival. Kiwiburn forbids the making of profit from the documentation of nudity at the event without the express written permission of the subjects and Kiwiburn.

What we expect from you

Celebrate! Celebrate our beautiful community with lovingly crafted photos, while still continuing to have a fantastic time and occasionally (gasp!) putting down the camera and enjoying Kiwiburn!

Caption and credit the subjects of your photos. Reliably and consistently gather data on what you are documenting. Please make a serious effort to know about what you are documenting: art installation name, artist, camp name, art car name, department, performance group, planet of origin, genus, species, etc. There are many reasons we request accurate captioning, including:
Give credit where it’s due. Artists, campers, performers, etc. work very hard to bring their art and creations to share with the community, the least we can do is try to make sure they get credit, just like you do!
Knowing your subject makes better photos. A lot of the best coverage comes from having a relationship with the subject matter or having done some homework ahead of time.
Don’t be a Creepster. Boobs, butts, and intimate body parts—thank you, but we have our own.
A little bit of nudity is not a bad thing, but please do not be one of those ‘creepy’ photographers who hangs around just at the edge of the stage, hoping to get a photo up the skirt of some inebriated first time burner girl learning to pole dance. Ewwww.

Organise and Edit your photos! Here’s how to do it right:
– Edit Your Work! Send only your very best, high-resolution, JPG or TIFF, photographs. We love your beautiful photographs, we really do, but it’s just not possible for us to do your photo editing. For example, if you have 300 beautiful shots of the Man burning, please only send us your top five favourites.
– Use smart filenames. Please embed your name and year in each image filename.